6 Tips for Faster Woodworking | Olive Slab Table Build



and caleb if you could make this to bruce and i came up to a meet-up here in kentucky the jeremy meadows put on we met Nick from lakeside wood shop and he invited us over to come to a build and did a table in a day so this is all about how to speed up woodworking and make something cool quickly Bruce is gonna have another video out eaten a similar table or a different table from the same slab anyway stick with me and I'll show you can make this do Nick showed Bruce and I a few places in his home that needed some furniture and I was drawn to this nook in his theater room it seemed a perfect place for a simple triangular table which is the first lbu done an obvious tip for speed if you want to build a quick project well pick one that can be built quickly a small slab top with a metal base this could only be faster if I used hairpin legs but I mean at that point could I even call it a build anyway the first step was picking out some material fortunately nick has a lot of hard wood slabs on hand I mean he gave me some serious wood envy but Bruce and I settled on this olive wood slab that Nick recommended because we thought we could both get our tabletops out of it the shape of my top is a little tricky so I figured it best to make a template first that way I could easily mark out exactly the piece of the slab that would look best for the table top a piece of scrap luan was perfect for the template and it only took a few minutes to clear off a work table mark it out and then cut it down with a track saw and miter saw the time to make the template paid off and it was easy to mark out the shape of the top the trouble with trying to sketch right on the slab is there wasn't a square corner to reference from after I plugged in the saw cutting down the slab was really straightforward and here's where Nick showed us the first trick for a working faster thicker slabs and some species are notorious for burning when cut which can be a real pain to sand especially trying to say in the edge without rounding over a corner anyway a trick his shop uses is to cut just outside of the line with the track saw and then slide it over and take a light pass similar to what a machinist would call a spring pass to just remove the barn burning of course that technique would work fine with whatever saw you're using be it table saw or circular saw with a guide or probably even a bandsaw but definitely not a seesaw the next tip is an obvious one but don't do by hand what can be done faster by machine that's why we buy machines the slab had been previously surfaced but it got a bit scuffed up from storage and being cut down but instead of spending an extra 10 minutes anding we took light passes on each side through the planer I know this planer is a beast but when possible size your assemblies or glue ups so they can fit through your machines if you have a two-foot tabletop and a 12 inch planer make a 1 foot section and plane both of those then join them into two feet of course that doesn't negate all sanding next will be some crack filling but because of the planing I was able to start at 120 and then jump higher and sand a little quicker here's a speed technique that Nick told us about to fill voids and cracks quickly they use bondo darkened with system 3 die normally on voids the size I would use epoxy but that's a one to three day process with the cure time but the bondo sets up and is ready to be sanded only 20 minutes after it's mixed which makes it great for working quickly but you do have to do just that don't mix until you're ready to apply and then work quickly as soon as the bondo started to set up I did my best to scrape some of the excess off the top to minimize the amount of sanding I'd have to do later which will also speed things up almost got two tips in there and no joke it was only about 20 minutes later and I was sanding the table if I'm sanding again now though why did I sand before the bondo well i sanded a high grit earlier to burnish the grain some before applying the bondo burnishing the grain like that helps prevent the bondo from creeping into the grain and makes it really only settle into the cracks and voids where I want it and with that the top is basically ready for finish so I jumped to working on the base first is getting some measurements right off the table I want the base to be a little shorter than the sides so I mark that then I mark and start cutting down the steel – to minimize math and errors and well math okay only math because I still screwed up I just take each piece of steel – back to the tabletop to measure in place with the second piece cut I come back to the table to mark everything in place for the long leg of the triangle free internet points to anyone that catches what stupid mistake I made ball marking and that's another great tip for working faster just don't make mistakes but before I get into that as I mentioned in the intro Bruce built a complementary cable with a few extra features like some bowties and a shelf be sure to hit the link below or in the card to head over and see his video and subscribe to his channel he's a great guy that does some amazing work and puts out some really high quality videos fortunately my mistake was one that was easily correctable and pieces were only off about half a bob though annoying all I had to do was mark on the proper side and cut the pieces again fortunately I cut the pieces too long which is a lot easier to deal with than cutting them too short off camera I cut down the steel tube to the right length and then was ready to weld I started by just tack welding the triangle together once it was together and I checked that the corner was still square I laid down full welds on the joints then like any barely adequate welder I paused to grind my welds while they're still easily accessible then I tacked on the corner upright a piece of angle iron metal has this habit of moving as you weld something to do with turning metal into a molten puddle and then rapidly cooling causes contraction anyway after the tack weld I wiggled my angle iron back into Square before adding more tacks to lock it into a square position before doing full welds then I repeated that process for the other two uprights except those uprights are just flat bar not angle iron in an ideal world I would have welded some stringers across the top to lock everything together but I had to leave some metal for Bruce to use for his table and Nick didn't have a whole lot on hand and once the top goes on top that's gonna lock everything together plenty strong for a side table or stepstool or a jack stand for a truck I mean this is eighth inch steel and an inch and a half thick slab its strong people the last thing to weld are these handy tabs which is another time-saving trick eeep often use Hardware on hand I ordered a pack of these as soon as they got home so I'll have them and I always sandpaper glue common screw sizes and finishing bulk and just keep it available and of course a little more grinding before the base is done with the base complete I had to take a little pause just to see how this was going to come together and now time to finish I wanted to keep the bark so I used a brush to knock off any loose pieces or dirt before applying a fast drying natural finish if I'd been thinking ahead more I could have saved even more time by starting the finishing process on the wood before I started welding anyway while you enjoy this delicious wood oiling footage leave a comment below about your favorite tip so far or some things you like to do to speed up projects in your shop so we can learn from your experience do [Music] an obvious tip for quicker projects is to take advantage of downtime the finish needs to soak a few minutes before it can be wiped off so I switched over to the metal base and use the technique Nick showed us they use in his shop first they wipe down the base with denatured alcohol then heat up the metal until the scale changes color then wipe on paste wax which melts in it's a super fast finish that seals the metal and prevents rusting and leaves a nice raw look to the steel then back to the wood top I wipe off the excess finish flip it over and finish the other side again it gets a few minutes to soak before being wiped off and then I attach the base now ideally it would have been given overnight to completely cure and I normally time my finishing that way but it was already after dinner and I still had a seven hour drive to get home and the top was dry enough that it was safe to set it on a blanket and screw the base into the underside so we did that so I could get some sweet glamour roles for you so there you go to wrap it up if you want to speed up a bill well start with something that you can build quick and if you're cutting thick material or woods that burn easy use a spring pass after your first cut to remove the burning instead of trying to sand it size components so they can fit through your machines and size them and smaller assemblies if you need it and assembly this larger than your largest machine can handle if you need to do any repair work try bondo or CA glue instead of epoxy for super fast cure time use fast drying finishes on this we used a natural Danish oil which is a quick wipe on wipe off finish and Nick actually has a giant UV light in their shop they used to quit here the finish when they're really in a hurry but if you've been around you know I normally use total boat Halcyon which has a one-hour dry time one tip I use a lot that didn't come into play here is avoid clamps if you can if you have to do a glue up try to use Brad nails or hidden screws as clamps instead they're quicker to apply and often are strong enough that you can keep working without having to wait or they flew to cure and just let it here in place anyway be sure to check out Bruce's video for his tips and project I hope you learn something were inspired or at least entertain if you feel I deserved it please hit that subscribe button and bell and most importantly until next time make time to make something [Music] [Music] a lie three inches perfect [Music] [Music]

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